Top
Close
Follow Us ON

© 2016 I am the walrus.

Advertise Here Flag
image description

I am the walrus.

Coo coo, kachoo.

Testing editing published post

testing

test

Testing editing a publish post Testing editing a publish postvTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish post

Testing editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish postTesting editing a publish post

Look for new text

Just Testing old girl out how come this isn't showing up

So we are continuing testing thanks PEte

Wayback Machine: Bestemianova & Bukin and Blumberg & Seibert, 1985 Worlds

A second test reblog

1985 was a stellar year for ice dance. There were plenty of cheesy Latin numbers, but it was one of the most innovative years of the 6.0 era. The two most memorable Worlds free dances of 1985 both resisted traditional ballroom style. They're both very '80s in some ways, but in others, they resemble contemporary ice dance more than I would have expected for a pair of 30-year-old programs.

Natalia Bestemianova and Andrei Bukin weren't the first ice dancers to perform a Carmen free dance, but theirs has been the template for most of the ice dance Carmens since, from Krylova and Ovsiannikov in the '90s to McNamara and Carpenter this past season. Many of the moves featured here have become ice dance standards, and Carmen tropes in particular: the lift where she walks on air, the part where he drags her across the ice before they hurl themselves into a desperate embrace. Bestemianova and Bukin were always more notable as performers than as technicians, which makes their skating more accessible today, since it's hard to see where they're getting those ballroom elements in. As much as Carmen might tempt a theatrical team like this one to overact, they're restrained when they need to be, and that makes the dramatic ending sequence all the more memorable.

I'm pretty sure this music already sounded dorky in the mid-1980s, to the point where it's almost due for an ironic comeback. At first, I thought the disco theme was an evolutionary dead end, but with hip hop short dances on the horizon, I wonder if this was early evidence that skaters can translate modern, urban dance forms to the ice. Regardless, this was one of Judy Blumberg and Michael Seibert's best free dance. It's a great showcase for Blumberg's lightness and quickness, but Seibert is the star. His partnering skills allowed them to do more intricate lifts than most ice dancers at the time, and he gets so into his performance around the halfway mark that he steals the show with his smile and his disco hip swivels.

Proud Boxing Moments from the T-Mobile

Testing a simple reblog

Joshua Dahl-USA TODAY Sports


​by Ted Sares

There were some brutal—and scary-- moments during the inaugural boxing card at the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas on April 7, but there were some special ones as well.


Saul “Canelo” Alvarez lived up to expectations by scoring a bone-rattling KO over Amir “King” Khan that left him unconscious before he hit the canvass with a dangerous bounce. Many were immediately and genuinely concerned for Amir’s health.  


However, when Canelo went to his knees to check out Amir’s condition, he repeated what he had done when he almost decapitated James Kirkland with the same crushing right one year ago. Saul “Canelo” Alvarez showed genuine concern for his fellow-man; he is a special kind of person.



But there was even more and that came when vastly improved Referee Russell Mora looked at Glen Tapia’s corner and tapped his heart to acknowledge their decision to stop the slaughter being administered by David Lemieux. Mora was about to do it anyway but he acknowledged the corner’s wisdom and humanity 


\


These kinds of things are often missed by the scribes but they send chills down my spine. They reflect rare dimension to boxing—one that is poignant and positive.


The positive part of the boxing community was on display last night and it nice to see.

Load